History

Well-played!!! Summer @ the coast. 2016.

Beach-Volleyball-Rally-Oregon_26-PM-1

 

 

 

 

 

Seaside beach volleyball. August 2016.

 

best sail boat

Astoria Regatta.  August 2016.

Astoira Bridge redication

Astoria-Megler Bridge 50th Anniversary rededication August 2016

Editorial: Signature events showcase coast
–The Daily Astorian Aug. 15, 2016/ Editorial

From sailing and parades to concerts and clowns, this past weekend was filled with crowd-pleasing events. Add in a bridge rededication and the world’s largest beach volleyball event, according to organizers, and it made for a signature showcase of the North Coast.

Organizers and sponsors of the 122nd Astoria Regatta festival, the Astoria Bridge rededication and the 35th annual Seaside Chamber Beach Volleyball event, and all the volunteers who helped at each, deserve a hearty congratulations and a job well done from us all.

Regatta had something for everyone, and was even more inclusive with Warrenton’s participation for the first time with festivities there as well as those in Astoria. The well-attended events included sailboat races, the coronation of Aubrey McMahan as Regatta queen, the annual Grand Land Parade, the Highwater Boat Parade, the planting of roses at Lighthouse Park and a free country music concert in Warrenton, a free concert in Astoria by the Columbia River Symphony, fireworks and, of course, clowns and all their hijinks.

The weekend also marked the 50th anniversary and a rededication of the Astoria Bridge with officials from both sides of the river participating along with dignitary guests from Astoria’s sister city of Walldorf, Germany.

In Seaside, at the chamber’s four-day beach volleyball tournament, more than 3,000 players on about 1,450 teams battled for championships in a host of different divisions. They were cheered on by large crowds of family members, friends and other spectators. The event has been recognized since 2011 by the World Records Academy as the country’s largest amateur beach volleyball tournament.

Each of the trio of events was well-run and well-supported as evidenced by the smiles from those who attended, and each of the events was successful and showcased the spirit and volunteerism of the coast at its best.

And, too, Buoy 10 opened!

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Q: Where is Buoy 10, you ask?

A: Most salmon fishing early in the season will be near the Buoy 10 at low incoming tide, following a rip upriver as the tide comes in. Later in the tide /& or season the fish seem to congregate near Astoria.ridge. The prime area is  buoy 10, as all the fish have to come past this to get upriver on the incoming tide.

Columbia River Maritime Museum

Photo of the Columbia River in August 2016 courtesy of http://www.FB.com/Maritime Museum.

What’s up next, you ask?

Enjoy seven days of kite-flying, beach-playing, festival-vending fun! World-renowned kite flyers converge on the Long Beach Peninsula annually during the Washington State International Kite Festival, a vivid celebration of summer that paints the sky. August 15-21, 2016

kite

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Word Nerd: Necanicum

Necanicum [nē•kæn•ɪ•kəm]noun1. Necanicum River: a 21-mile-long river that flows west off of Humbug Mountain alongside U.S. 26 only to change course as it nears the coast and head north, bisecting Seaside before depositing into the Pacific Ocean.

The Necanicum River forms the first estuary south of the mouth of the Columbia River, providing many tributaries and wetlands with runoff as well as drinking water for the City of Seaside.

1. The Necanicum River forms the first estuary south of the mouth of the Columbia River, providing many tributaries and wetlands with runoff as well as drinking water for the City of Seaside. Coho and other species of salmon utilize the Necanicum River for spawning.

2. an unincorporated community located 13 miles east of Seaside in the foothills of the Coast Range alongside U.S. 26. Necanicum Junction has a convenience store and gas station and a bus stop served by both the Sunset Empire Transportation District and Amtrak.

3. Necanicum Drive: a two-mile, north-south roadway in Seaside that hugs the west bank of the Necanicum River between First and 12th Avenues.

4. Necanicum Watershed Council: servicing a population of less than 10, 000 over more than 54,000 acres and 86 stream miles that cover the Necanicum, Neawanna and Neacoxie water systems, the watershed council is responsible for providing municipal water to the City of Seaside and floodplain protection as well as protecting natural wildlife refuges and salmon breeding grounds.

Origin:

Most likely derived from the Tillamook Salish. Necanicum is thought to be an anglicization of Ne-hay-ne-hum, which was the name of an Indian lodge near the ocean and utilizes the prefix, ne-, meaning “place.” William Clark first marked it as Kil â mox (a variant that would eventually become Killamook, then Tillamook) to describe a “butifull river” that emptied into the Pacific, but later crossed it off his map and renamed it the Clatsop River on January 7, 1806, though that name would not stick. Known for awhile as Latty Creek, in honor of early pioneer resident William Latty, the river was recorded as Nekonikon in 1887. Necanacum and Nekanikum were other spelling variations. The community of Necanicum was first known as “Alhers” as the area post office was named after Herman Alhers, the first and only postmaster at the location. Alhers himself changed the name of the post office to “Push” in 1899, though the post office and town finally settled on Necanicum in 1907 due to the community’s proximity to the river. The post office closed in 1916, only one year after the U.S. Geological Board adopted the current spelling in 1915 based off a decision concerning local pronunciation. While it is accepted that the original meaning of the name is lost to history, Postmaster Alhers maintained that Necanicum meant “a gap in the mountains,” though many historians find this unlikely as the location of the original Indian lodge was close to the ocean.

“Mr. Grimes, Proprietor of the hotel which bears his name on Clatsop Beach, is engaged in the construction of a new bridge across Necanacum (or Latta’s), river which will very materially shorten the distance in that vicinity, and give a better road to travel.”

— “New Bridge,” Tri-Weekly Astorian, Thursday, July 3, 1873, P. 2

“Another important improvement planned for this year is the further improvement of the Twelfth avenue route to the beach. A bridge has already been constructed Necanicum river at this point, and by the improvement of the road to the beach and the laying out of a turnaround here facilities for reaching the ocean by automobile will be greatly increased and congestion relieved from the Broadway turnaround.”

— H. W. Lyman, “Seaside Prepares for Greatest Season,” The Sunday Oregonian, May 21, 1922, Section 6, P. 1

Source: Word Nerd: Necanicum

Article reprinted from May 18, 2016 http://www.coastweekend.com/ The Daily Astorian.

Fun Fact: The Necanicum River flows under the Broadway Bridge in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside.

What is the story behind the mural in the historic Gilbert District, you ask?

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We “Gilbertonians” are reprinting information about the outdoor mural on what is now the North side of Ace Hardware at the corner of Broadway and Holloday, also known as the Menzel Building, located in the historic Gilbert District of downtown Seaside, Oregon:

The 60 ft. long mural by artist Roger Cooke of Sandy, Oregon was dedicated during Seaside First Saturday Art Walk in 2008 and has recently been restored.

The mural depicts scenes of the daily life of the Clatsop and Nehalem tribes at the Seaside estuary with Tillamook Head in the background. Included in the painting will be images of historic tribal members such as Tostum, Chief of the Clatsop Tribe in the early 1800’s.

“Murals are an opportunity to bring history to life on a grand scale,” said Tribal Chairwoman Diane Collier. “They give people a way to get acquainted with local background in a very compelling manner. Cooke’s work is a significant addition to our area and a showpiece for both locals and visitors. We hope many of you will come to the dedication and enjoy learning more from our storytellers and artists.”

Please visit http://www.facebook/ Seaside First Saturday Art Walk for more information.

Seaside First Saturday Art Walk back story.

Cathy Tippin, mosaic artist, and Ray Coffey, her husband and musician, who operate the oldest art gallery in Seaside, SunRose Gallery, founded the Seaside First Saturday Art Walk in 2004.
In 2014, the Art Walk became an all-volunteer organization dedicated to preserving the cultural arts in the downtown core area of Seaside.

In honor of the much appreciated hundredth anniversary of the historic Gilbert District (1914-2014) and the 10th anniversary of Seaside First Saturday Art Walk (2004-2014), the event in 2014 was re-aligned to feature North coast talents, pop-up author readings, quick finish art demonstrations, live music, light bites, wine tastings, artist talks and receptions in a walk-about throughout the historic Gilbert District.

Fun Fact: 2014 marked the 10th year since the District won the Oregon Downtown Gateway Award.

The artists featured, many who are acclaimed regional, national, international talents, as well as, emerging talents, have a connection to the coastal community. Oftentimes sharing narratives about creating in the land between the mountains and the ocean during the Art Walks.

The Seaside First Saturday Art Walk happens on the first Saturday of each month, 5-7pm, sometimes lasting to 8pm, depending on good weather and good crowds, in the area between Holladay and Broadway, one block west of the Pacific Coast Highway (Highway 101) in the historic Gilbert District.

It’s a destination that includes well-established businesses, galleries, restaurants and boutiques, as well as, an eclectic array of new and upcoming stores. Dedicated parking for the historic Gilbert District is on the corner of Ocean way and Holladay.

For more information go to:
https://www.facebook.com/Seaside First Saturday Art Walk

Alexandre Gilbert Founder of the Gilbert District

Alexandre Gilbert Founder of the Gilbert District

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Seaside’s unique Gilbert District along Broadway was created by a very unique man, Frenchman Alexandre Gilbert, Sr., who was Mayor of Seaside from 1912-16, and helped rebuild downtown after the devastating fire of 1912.

Gilbert was born in Lucon and became a naturalized citizen of the U.S. in August of 1877, relocating from San Francisco to Astoria in 1881 where he ran a wholesale and retail liquor business. In 1889, Gilbert served as commissioner for the State of Oregon at the Paris Exhibition and was in charge of the Oregon exhibits.

According to the Clatsop County Historical Society, Gilbert moved to Seaside in the early 1890s and built a large, Queen-Anne style house that sits at 341 Beach Dr. During the next few years he would continue buying property and developing the town.

“The work he did to develop property in Seaside was much admired, considered a benefit to all, a way of showing confidence in the future of the town,” wrote Lisa Penner (Cumtux, Vol. 22, No. 3).

According to records at the Seaside Museum and Historical Society, Gilbert bought up property downtown after the fire and loaned money to several businessmen to rebuild or repair as necessary. The Gilbert Insurance Company carried much of the coverage on the destroyed buildings, and as mayor and a businessman, Gilbert saw that the town recovered and people continued to prosper.

In the June 11, 1914, Seaside Signal reported “Building operations on the new $60,000 Gilbert building at the corner of 7th Street and Broadway, are being pushed to the highest capacity and this beautiful structure will be completed and ready for occupancy by the middle of July.”

Gilbert also donated to the city a strip of land along the beach that would later be used for Seaside’s Promenade, according the Gilbert’s great-granddaughter, Virginia McConkey-Hendrickson.

“He envisioned families strolling along the boardwalk with their children, and then sitting down on the grass to enjoy a picnic, much as he remembered them doing in France,” McConkey-Hendrickson said.

Some mystique does follow Gilbert, as great-granddaughter Kathleen McConkey-Kulland describes in Cumtux: “ A story that I cannot verify is that he owned a fancy bar and brothel in Astoria on Astor Street (the local Red Light district), which included a trapdoor in the floor through which drunken men were dropped into waiting boats, and when they sobered up, they were aboard a ship at sea and were part of the ship’s crew.”

Gilbert owned 600 lots called “Hermosa Park Development” which stretched from Avenue A to the Lewis and Clark Salt Cairn, and from the river to the waterfront. He also owned much of the land that is now Sunset Hills. When Gilbert died on April 26, 1935, Seaside businesses closed from 9 to 10 a.m. during funeral services to honor him. He is buried in the Gilbert tier at the Abbey View Mausoleum at the Ocean View Cemetery in Warrenton.

 

OLD TIME SEASIDER IS DEAD

Alexander Gilbert, 90, resident of Clatsop county for more than 60 years and a veteran of the Franco-Prusian (sic) war, passed away at his home in Seaside early Friday after a short illness. He was active in the real estate business almost to the time of his death and was well known in both Astoria and Seaside.

He was born in La Rochelle, France, April 16, 1845, and received his education there. He entered military service and served as a first lieutenant in the Franco-Prussian war. After the war ended he moved to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he resided for 6 months before going to San Francisco where he was proprietor of the Gilbert House.

Here for 33 Years

After a year’s residence in San Francisco, he came to Astoria and resided here for about 33 years. He was in the real estate business here and maintained his interest in that business when he moved to Seaside about 29 years ago.

Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Fred Watson, Astoria, and Mrs. Victor R. Finch, Portland: a son, Alexander Gilbert, Seaside; and four grandchildren and eight great grandchildren.

Rites Are Monday

Funeral services will be held at the Gilbert home at 2605 First Street South in Seaside at 9 a.m. Monday with Father Charles Raymond officiating. Internment will be in the Oceanview cemetery mausoleum under direction of E.M. Hughes mortuary.

(printed in the Daily Astorian)

 

Birth: Apr. 16, 1846
La Rochelle
Departement de la Charente-Maritime
Poitou-Charentes, France
Death: Apr. 26, 1935
Seaside
Clatsop County
Oregon, USA

GELBERT (sic) – Alexandre, aged 90, died Friday morning, April 26, at his home in Seaside. Survived by two daughters, Mrs. Fred W. Watson, Astoria, and Mrs. Victor R. Finch, Portland, Or. One son, Alexander Gilbert Jr., Seaside: four grandchildren, eight great-granchildren. Funeral services will be held Monday, April 29, at 9 A.M. at home in Seaside, with Father Charles Raymond officiating. Vault entombment at Oceanview Abbey, under direction of E. B. Hughes Mortuary, Astoria, Or.(printed in the 27 Apr 1935 Oregonian)

Seaside’s downtown Renaissance

  • The historic downtown Gilbert District sees a wave of new life

Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2013 8:00 am

DWIGHT CASWELL PHOTO

DWIGHT CASWELL PHOTO

From highway 101 in Seaside, take Broadway toward the beach, and you’ll immediately find yourself in the historic downtown Gilbert District. The first building you will see was built in 1914 as a firehouse. It later became a jail and then city hall. Today it is Seaside’s first brewpub, the Seaside Brewing Company, and kegs are stored in what used to be the drunk tank. Go a little farther, and you will find yourself at the intersection of Broadway and Holladay Drive. Look ahead and to the left is the Kirwen Building, built in 1913, and to the right is a building called the “Gilbert Block,” from which the district gets its name.

The buildings are old – it’s a historic district, after all – but there’s fresh paint and, if you look a little closer, shops with fresh ideas. There’s a Renaissance going on in the Gilbert District, and at the center of this revitalization are Avery Loschen and Will Perkin, owners of the Gilbert Block and the adjacent Salmonberry Square. For their work in renovating the buildings they won a 2004 Main Street Award.

A large part of the commercial success of this area is the way in which the property owners have orchestrated the variety and boutique nature of the stores and restaurants in the Gilbert District. You can buy a purse or a vintage lunch box and then have an excellent meal at an Irish pub, an Italian restaurant or a sushi lounge. Later you can sample wine, buy flowers at a European-style florist, visit an art gallery, or get something special for the pooch in your life.

Denise Fairweather, of Fairweather House and Garden, has another explanation for the district’s growing popularity. Alexandre Gilbert was a colorful character, she says, “and we have to live up to that.”

Gilbert, a Frenchman and a naturalized U.S. citizen, was that and more. A veteran of the Franco-Prussian War, Gilbert moved first to San Francisco and then to Astoria, where he operated a liquor business and saloon. There were also rumors that he was involved in Astoria’s infamous “Shanghaied” trade. With all his business interests he became, of course, a civic leader, and was in charge of the exhibits for the State of Oregon at the 1889 Paris Exposition.

In the early 1890s Gilbert moved to Seaside, and by 1912 he was elected mayor. This was shortly after the disastrous fire of that year, and Gilbert bought downtown property where he erected the Gilbert Block. The four city blocks surrounding the intersection of Broadway and Holladay Drive, including the Kirwen building, constitute the Gilbert District.

Today there are over 20 businesses in the district. Some have been there for a while, like  Bagels by the Sea; others, like Beach Books, literally arrived last week.

Beach Books owner Karen Emmerling moved her store two blocks to be in the Gilbert District, right at the intersection of Broadway and Holladay. “I think it’s the best block in the neighborhood for visibility,” she says, “and it’s such a historic building.”

Emmerling’s new shop is much larger than the old, so she will expand, carrying cards, art supplies, puzzles and magazines in addition to the latest literary best sellers and old favorites. Beach Books is known for its monthly catered author luncheons, and now the business has more room for additional events like readings and author signings. Emmerling won’t be putting in a coffee bar, however. Why compete with Seaside Coffee House, her neighbor across the street? Instead she’ll add seating so people can bring their coffee into the bookstore.

This sort of cooperation among Gilbert District shop owners is not unusual. Fairweather House and Garden has an elegant array of one-of-a-kind home furnishings, but if you’re looking for a painting, Denise Fairweather will gladly send you across the street to the artist-owned Gilbert District Gallery. “We’re like a big club,” she says. “We often have progressive events with different refreshments at each shop. And if I sweep my walk or water the flower box, I may find myself in the middle of an impromptu gathering.”

DWIGHT CASWELL PHOTO

DWIGHT CASWELL PHOTO

Gatherings are what another new business is all about. “A public house isn’t a bar,” says Vince Berg, co-owner of Seaside Brewing Company. “It’s a gathering place for the public.” Berg and partner Jimmy Griffin opened in June of 2012 and soon found that their tiny “nanobrewery” couldn’t keep up with demand. It will shortly be relegated to educating those interested in brewing, after their new, larger production facility is completed. The partners spent five months restoring the old building, while keeping its character intact, and it was well worth the trouble. “When we saw that this property was available,” says Berg, “we knew it would be a home run as a pub.”

Beach Books and Seaside Brewing are not the only new businesses bringing new life to the Gilbert District. There’s Nikki Luxuria Salon,  and Patty’s Wicker Cafe. Both businesses and customers are attracted to the Gilbert District because of the emphasis on quality as well as variety, but the Renaissance of this boutique shopping and dining area isn’t over. “The more quality there is in the Gilbert District,” says Vince Berg, “the better for Seaside. There’s so much potential.”

Gilbert’s Mark

http://www.seasidesignal.com/articles/2009/01/15/news/local_news/doc496f7cdeb7208405954209.prt

Frenchman’s vision changes Seaside forever
(Created: Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:02 AM PST)

Donald Allison

(Editor’s note: This is part of a continuing series of stories about the history of Seaside)

Seaside’s unique Gilbert District along Broadway was created by just as unique of a man, Frenchman Alexandre Gilbert, Sr., who was Mayor of Seaside from 1912-16, and helped rebuild downtown after the devastating fire of 1912.

Gilbert was born in Lucon and became a naturalized citizen of the U.S. in August of 1877, relocating from San Francisco to Astoria in 1881 where he ran a wholesale and retail liquor business. In 1889, Gilbert served as commissioner for the State of Oregon at the Paris Exhibition and was in charge of the Oregon exhibits.

According to the Clatsop County Historical Society, Gilbert moved to Seaside in the early 1890s and built a large, Queen-Anne style house that sits at 341 Beach Dr. During the next few years he would continue buying property and developing the town.

“The work he did to develop property in Seaside was much admired, considered a benefit to all, a way of showing confidence in the future of the town,” wrote Lisa Penner (Cumtux, Vol. 22, No. 3).

According to records at the Seaside Museum and Historical Society, Gilbert bought up property downtown after the fire and loaned money to several businessmen to rebuild or repair as necessary. The Gilbert Insurance Company carried much of the coverage on the destroyed buildings, and as mayor and a businessman, Gilbert saw that the town recovered and people continued to prosper.

One of the buildings lost in the fire was the Catholic Church on Court Street, and because of money owed for the construction of the church buildings, the property that it had sat on was sold. Gilbert, in 1913, donated property to the church and “started a building-fund boom.” The church was erected and dedicated in 1914, where Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church stands today.

In the June 11, 1914, Seaside Signal reported “Building operations on the new $60,000 Gilbert building at the corner of 7th Street and Broadway, are being pushed to the highest capacity and this beautiful structure will be completed and ready for occupancy by the middle of July.”

Gilbert also donated to the city a strip of land along the beach that would later be used for Seaside’s Promenade, according the Gilbert’s great-granddaughter, Virginia McConkey-Hendrickson.

“He envisioned families strolling along the boardwalk with their children, and then sitting down on the grass to enjoy a picnic, much as he remembered them doing in France,” McConkey-Hendrickson said.

As a child visiting her great-grandfather at the Gilbert House in Seaside, McConkey-Hendrickson said his kisses on both cheeks were always special, prickly mustache and all.

“He really didn’t quite know how to relate to small children, so he made up for it by giving us something,” McConkey-Hendrickson said. “He jingled the silver dollars in his pocket, and when we were ready to go home, he would give us each a silver dollar. On the way home, I felt so rich.”

Some mystique does follow Gilbert, as great-granddaughter Kathleen McConkey-Kulland describes in Cumtux: “ A story that I cannot verify is that he owned a fancy bar and brothel in Astoria on Astor Street (the local Red Light district), which included a trapdoor in the floor through which drunken men were dropped into waiting boats, and when they sobered up, they were aboard a ship at sea and were part of the ship’s crew.”

McConkey-Kulland said because of Gilbert’s love of French escargot, he imported the snails from Europe and kept them in little hutches behind his house.

“The hutches had wire screens and he fed them lettuce until they were big enough to eat,” McConkey-Kulland said. “Some of the eggs fell through the screens on to the ground and from there they multiplied and moved off.”

Gilbert owned 600 lots called “Hermosa Park Development” which stretched from Avenue A to the Lewis and Clark Salt Cairn, and from the river to the waterfront. He also owned much of the land that is now Sunset Hills. When Gilbert died on April 26, 1935, Seaside businesses closed from 9 to 10 a.m. during funeral services to honor him. He is buried in the Gilbert tier at the Abbey View Mausoleum at the Ocean View Cemetery in Warrenton.

Gilbert Inn Bed and Breakfast owner and operator Jeannie Vick said Gilbert had a getaway cabin in Seaside while he lived in Astoria, and later he and his wife, Emma, built the house that is the Gilbert Inn. The getaway cabin is still there, but hidden away inside the huge Inn.

As a child, Vick used to stay at the Gilbert Inn with her family who would make the trip to Seaside from Portland.

“My grandparents were good friends with Alex’s grandchildren,” Vick said. “It was just a beach house.”

doc496f7cdeb7208405954209

A Brief Biography of Alexandre Gilbert

http://www.gilbertinn.com/history.html

Alexandre Gilbert was born in LaRochelle, France on April 16, 1843. As a young man he served seven years in the French Army.  He rose to the rank of sergeant during the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871).

One of nine children, he emigrated from France to Montreal, Quebec after the war.  He left Canada and moved to San Francisco, California in 1872. There he built the Gilbert House Hotel whch he operated for eight years.

n 1881 he moved north to Astoria, Oregon (18 miles up the road from the Gilbert Inn in Seaside).  He operated a saloon and retail liquor business, which had “rooms for single women” on the second floor.  Originally founded as a port for fur trappers by John Jacob Astor in 1810 (just four years after Lewis and Clark spent the winter in nearby Ft. Clatsop), Astoria enjoyed some wild times in the 19th century.  The local newspaper reported a couple of shootings outside Gilbert’s saloon.   There were regular reports of strange diappearances.

Rough and tumble sailors provided much of the Astoria excitement.  Gilbert befriended many of the sea captains who called upon the port at the mouth of the Columbia River.  There were rumors, indeed only mutterings, that Gilbert may have played some part in Astoria‘s Shanghaiing operations, which supplied unwilling sailors to more than a few ocean going skippers.

alexgilbertastoriahouse

Gilbert sold the liquor business in 1898 and retired with his wife, the former Emma Longol, also a French ex-patriot, to real estate ventures in Seaside, Oregon.  He lived in the summer house, the Gilbert House, which had begun as a beach cottage built in the 1880’s (today’s Gilbert Inn “1880’s Suite”).

Gilbert kept in touch with many of his captain friends over the years.  Often he would entertain them in the house that is now the Gilbert Inn.  For many years one of his prize collections contained pieces of steamship company China his seagoing friends gave him.*

In Seaside, Gilbert owned the six hundred lot Hermosa Park Development, and the land where the Seaside City Park and Sunset Hills are now located.  He also owned the Gilbert Block at Broadway and Holladay He built that after the 1912 Seaside fire.  Most of the buildings Gilbert constructed in Clatsop County, Oregon, are still standing.

He was first to import live French escargot to Oregon.  Some of the snails escaped before Alexandre could offer them at table to his guests.  Their offspring may still be found wandering the moister parts of Seaside.

He made his own wine from imported French grapes and mineral water.  Dick Rees, the owner and operator of the Gilbert Inn for twenty years until 2004, reported that several bottles of his homemade wine were still in the cellar of the Gilbert House, now the Gilbert Inn, in 1971.

gilbertinnoriginalpicture

The Gilbert House, now known as the Gilbert Inn

Alexandre Gilbert died at home in Seaside, Oregon on April 26, 1935.  He is buried in the Gilbert tier at the Abbey View Mausoleum at the Ocean View Cemetery in Warrenton, Oregon.

The Gilbert Inn is in Seaside, Oregon.  It was in the Gilbert family and used as their private beach home until the 1970’s.  It has been operated as a bed and breakfast inn since the 1980’s under three owners.

A most recent owner purchased the Gilbert Inn in 2008.  The owner’s first goal is to maintain the house and its traditions in ways that will promote your enjoyment, comfort, good memories
and romance (the people of the Gilbert Inn hope to create a setting to
inspire you!).